The Great Star Trek Enterprise Rewatch: The Breach

When three Denobulan scientists need retrieving from a deep cave system, Travis, Malcolm and Trip are sent to collect them. Meanwhile, Dr Phlox faces a dilemma when a patient refuses life-saving treatment because his race has been an enemy of the Denobulans for generations.

The Breach brings us two stories in one episode, so let’s set about examining them both. First off, we have the cave mission, led by Travis Mayweather, spelunker extraordinaire. Anyone who remembers how Travis broke his arm rock climbing in Two Days and Two Nights, and who has picked up on his tendency to get hurt, can easily predict what happens next. Yes, Travis hurts himself along the way, and has to wait for Trip and Reed to finish the mission.

It’s not even that exciting a storyline. If you’re not particularly enthralled by uncooperative scientists or shots of people adjusting their climbing gear, then there’s really nothing here for you.

So, then, what of the Phlox story? Tackling a moral issue feels like more solid ground for Star Trek, but sadly this story feels a bit too tame. The “we should stop hating each other” theme lacks the complexity of the best Star Trek morality plays, leaving us only with the dilemma as to whether Phlox should save someone who has refused treatment. This could potentially be an interesting plotline, but of course we already saw it in Voyager’s Nothing Human. And besides, Archer rides roughshod over any kind of moral issues by ordering Phlox to treat his patient no matter what. Typical Archer.

Franchise nods

  • Phlox shows Hoshi a tribble and explains its prodigious reproductive capabilities. He then feeds it to one of his sickbay pets.

Points of Note

  • We already knew that Phlox wasn’t in contact with his two youngest sons. Here he explains that he fell out with Mettus, the youngest, after Mettus fell in with a bad crowd.

Summary – The Breach: Two mediocre storylines for the price of one.

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